10 Things I Did to Rid my Rosacea

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Today I am very happy with my skin. I have never seen it so clear. Rosacea is a chronic condition, so it might not be the case that it stays like this. Hopefully it’ll last a while and either way, I have found many ways to manage the symptoms before they get really bad.

Quercetin Supplements

Quercetin is a type of flavonoid antioxidant that’s found in plant foods, including leafy greens, tomatoes, berries and broccoli. I am a big fan of quercetin. I noticed a huge difference in the flushing part of my rosacea when I started taking the supplements. I found that taking small doses of it before I ate best.

Azaliac Acid

I was prescribed this by the GP after trying a few different topical treatments to no avail. I definitely think it helped with the little spots and evened out the lumpy areas. I am prescribed a gel, but you can purchase a lower dose suspension by The Ordinary Company which I have linked above.

Pure Potions Daily Moisturizer

I was gifted with this product by Pure Potions and it definitely changed my skin. It stopped looking so angry and feeling hot. This brand is great for people with sensitive or dry skin. I always put it on before the azaliac acid to minimise the drying out. It is cruelty  free and all natural ingredients are used.

Ranitidine

I found I was flushing whenever I had a drink and I hated it. I don’t drink that often anymore, but still really enjoy a social drink and wasn’t willing to stop. I then found a thread on Reddit about Rosacea and ranitidine. Apparently, it is street knowledge that if you take one tablet 20 minutes before having a drink, it stops the flush. I thought I’d give this a try, as I already have to take things for stomach acid. It did seem to work for me, but I don’t make a habit out of it. It’s best to speak to your doctor about medications before taking them.

Rose Hip Oil

I use rose hip oil everywhere now. I swear by the Trilogy one. I really think this is what took my skin from looking good to excellent. I think it has helped heal leftover scars from spots and gives me a lovely glow. I cannot get enough of this product.

Polaar Arctic Cotton Scrub

I was left with lots of dry flakey bits after spotty episodes and felt like I needed a good scrub. It’s hard to find scrubs which are suitable for rosacea. A lot of them aggravate it and make my spider veins come up. This one is fine and very gentle, but very effective. It also smells amazing. It is my favourite smell. I try to limit myself to using it twice a week, because I just want to be smothered in the smell everyday.

FODMAP Diet

I took a food allergy test a few years ago because I suffer terribly with bloating and general tummy troubles. I had positive reactions to dairy, egg and gluten. I cut out dairy and eggs but ignored the gluten, because I thought it would be too hard.

I was still getting a lot of bloating and also felt that my skin flared up after certain foods, but still wasn’t sure which ones. I decided to try the FODMAP diet after reading a blog by TalontedLex.

It involves cutting out a lot of foods and is extremely hard. I used an app by Kings College which I have linked above, to scan foods to tell me if they were suitable. It was handy when I fancied a treat and there was a long list of ingredients on the packet.

I found that the inflammation in my skin had completely gone after a month of doing it. I really think I put it down to cutting out gluten and soya. I still try to stick to a FODMAP friendly diet, but am less strict if there are traces of some of the high FODMAP foods in something I want to eat. I try to keep meals as simple as possible, and eat in small portions. I no longer feel bloated and the red patches on my skin have gone.

Face Mist

Stopping my face from getting too hot has been a big part of my strategy. I carry around the Trilogy Face Mist with me everywhere I go and have a fews sprays a day. It gives your make up a nice dewy look but also soothes and cools your face instantly. Perfect to stop you drying out in the office!

Not Washing my Face in the Morning

This sounds really weird, but I found using water on my face first thing in the morning seemed to make my face go blotchy. So I switched to just dabbing on cleansing oil. I felt that doing this started to break the cycle of flushing.

Antihistamines

I do think a lot of my issues are allergy based. Before I was diagnosed with Rosacea, I was constantly getting hives on my face. Keeping topped up on certirizine has kept my itchy skin at bay and it also means I’m touching my face a lot less.

 

Rosacea is such a miserable condition but with a good plan of attack hopefully it can be controlled!

‘May Require Heavy Lifting’: jobs and Disability

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*RANT ALERT*

I’ve had some bad interviews recently. I mean, blog worthily bad.

I’ve always performed really well in interviews. Generally, if I’ve got my foot in the door I can get the job. This has changed recently, but I don’t think it’s entirely my fault.

I am dyspraxic, I have vertigo and I also have Hypermobility Spectrum Disorder. The way this affects me in regards to jobs are that I can’t lift heavy things, I can’t climb up high things and I can’t crawl around on the floor or anything like that. These shouldn’t really be a problem for me because I come from a writing background, so have worked in social media and copywriting for big well known brands. My disabilities never caused any issue in my past jobs.

I’ve had a couple of really weird interviews recently, in which the job descriptions did not reflect what they were looking for:

The Tea Company

This job looked fairly interesting. They were looking for a social media manager to lift the profile of their tea brand online. They had advertised for someone with copywriting, photography, SEO and general social media skills. This is pretty much what I’ve been up to for the past 4 years, so when I was contacted by a recruiter about it, I thought it seemed quite hopefully.

When I turned up to the interview it was very odd. They also owned a luxury home company, which they wanted help on social media with. I thought, that’s alright, I can do that. It suddenly turned to ‘well, you’d be on a building site most weeks’. Hang on a minute. How have we gone from social media manager for a tea company to walking around in a hard hat and up scaffolding?

He then asked ‘well, could you cope working with all the men on the building site?’ Firstly, if he’s trying to stereotype these men, e.g. they’re wolf whistling or whatever, that is their wrong, not mine for ‘not coping‘. Secondly, why would I be working with people on a building site as a social media manager. Maybe, I can imagine occasionally going to take some photos or something, but this seemed as if it was the main part of the job.

He’d done what SO many employers do and presumed that ‘most’ people can walk around on a building site, so why does it need mentioning? Of course it needs mentioning, you can’t make assumptions that everyone applying to a writing role would be physically able to do that. You haven’t advertised anything physical, so why should I know that will be expected of me?

I wonder, if I’d turned up using some form of mobility aid, whether he would have just rejected me immediately.

Also, when he left he said ‘oh don’t worry about paying for the teas we drank’. In the teashop he owns…thanks m8.

The School

This was one has upset me recently. I got rejected from this job, and I can’t claim it’s because I’m disabled, but there was something in the second stage interview that was odd.

This job was an office based job. The job description detailed social media management, website management, relationship outreach, copywriting and event planning. The first interview went really well and seemed very positive. I was there for 2 hours discussing all the ideas I had for events and we went on a tour of the school so I could see the facilities I could use if I worked there. I told the first person about how I may struggle with lifting heavy things at events as I have dyspraxia, but I’m very happy to help with all other setting up. They were absolutely fine with this and told me that the site manager usually does stuff like that.

I was invited to second stage interview and the day before my second interview, they wanted me to get my references to hand in personal and detailed references by the end of the day of my second interview-I thought this seemed quite positive too.

On the day of the second interview, I was interview by the deputy headmistress which went well. Then I was interview by another lady, who I hadn’t been told I’d be interviewed by. I was told she just wanted a ‘quick chat’. I thought it was that she wanted to meet the person she may be working with and to introduce herself/explain what she does.

Straight away she got a clipboard out and started grilling me. She briefly touched on my experience and made remarks such as ‘I see you have a lot of experience in social media, have you used Facebook before?’ COME ONN. If she’d actually read my C.V, she wouldn’t need to ask such a basic question.

She then really honed in on the event side of things. Her question was ‘how do you feel about getting really stuck in with setting up the events?’ My response was honest; ‘I’m very happy to get involved in as much as I can, but I can’t lift really heavy things because I have dyspraxia.’ She looked really taken aback and didn’t really respond. So I said ‘I was told the site manager usually helps with those things.’ She replied ‘well, yes, but I like to do it myself and get properly stuck in’.

For the rest of the interview, she spent the time craning her neck to look out of the window behind my head and didn’t really look at me again. I found it so rude and upsetting because it happened almost immediately after I’d said about heavy lifting. She made me feel like I should be embarrassed by my disabilities.

When I asked why I’d been rejected from the job they used the reason that I had less event management experience than the other candidate. Now of course, this other person probably was just more experienced than me, but It did make me wonder whether it was related to that strange reaction from that lady.

Some people have said to me that I should just nod along and say I’m happy to do these things. I don’t think I should have to. I have applied to jobs in good faith, thinking they have been advertised correctly. Yes, all jobs sometimes have extra duties not advertised, but these jobs main focuses were completely different to the advert.

I shouldn’t have to lie and risk hurting myself or someone else. Any job which may require heavy lifting or climbing up ladders etc should include that somewhere in the advert or they should be able to cope with someone who can’t do those things, but excels at the core parts of the job.

These are only a couple of experiences, but I’ve had so many where people have made me feel as if I’ve been a nuisance to them because I can’t lift heavy things. Trust me, it’s more annoying for me than you. Dyspraxia and hypermobility affect me every day of my life in lots of little and big ways. I’m incredibly adaptable because of this, but there are a few things I just can’t do, and that’s ok. I’ve been honest and applied to jobs which haven’t detailed those things I can’t do.

I just wish employers acknowledged that disabled people do exist, they do work, they all differ. I cannot begin to image what it is like for people who do use mobility aids or have  more physical disabilities than me, who have turned up to interviews like this-I’m sure it must happen often.

Also please advertise if you have an office dog! I love dogs so much, but I am incredibly allergic. Epipen level allergic. I know it must be annoying for people with dogs, but it’s worse for me. I need to know if there will regularly be a dog somewhere I’m regularly going to be. I won’t be able to take the job and everyone’s time will have been wasted if I go to interview…and I’ll just get sad that I can’t stoke the dog.

 

Why I Love Hydrotherapy

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When I was a teenager I was a competitive swimmer. Being in water felt a lot more natural to me than being on land!

When I was 15 I subluxed (partially dislocated) my kneecap in the pool. It was then that I was diagnosed with being hypermobile. It was a relatively minor subluxation and since then I’ve only ever subluxed that knee again, once last year.

Despite my joints being very stable and pain free for a hypermobile person, this last injury left me really nervous of my own body. I was frighten to move properly… let alone exercise, in case another joint might do the same thing.

My osteopath suggested that I try hydrotherapy as a way of easing back into exercise and for strengthening my body. At the time I also had an NHS physiotherapist, who I told about this idea. She scoffed and said that ‘hydrotherapy  is for decrepit people’. For a start that is a really derogatory word to use…especially coming from someone in her position. It’s shocking. But even if that word was ok to use, she is just plain wrong about hydrotherapy. There are lots of different types of exercises that people can do in the pool, which can be tailored to their abilities and needs.

So, generally hydrotherapy is the use of water in the treatment of different conditions, including arthritis and related rheumatic complaints. Hydrotherapy differs from swimming because it involves special exercises that you do in a warm-water pool. The water temperature is usually 33–36ºC, which is warmer than a typical swimming pool. I actually did mine is a normal temperature pool, as I was ok to take a colder temperature.

You’ll normally have hydrotherapy treatment within a hospital’s physiotherapy department. Usually a physiotherapist or a physiotherapist’s assistant with specialist training will show you how to do the exercises. The focus of the exercises can be adjusted to help your range of movement or strength, depending on your symptoms.

Hydrotherapy tends to be different to aquarobics, which can be quite strenuous, as it’s generally more focused on slow, controlled movements and relaxation.

I’ve decided to compile a list of some of my favourite exercises which I still use to keep fit, a long side swimming, weights and walking.

1. Water walking or jogging: Start with forward and backward walking in chest or waist high water. Walk about 10-20 steps forward, and then walk backward. Increase speed to make it more difficult. Also, increase intensity by jogging gently in place. Alternate jogging for 30 seconds with walking in place for 30 seconds. Continue for 5 minutes. Place you hands on your hips as you do this, to really help practice your balance. It’s hard that it look, and you’ll feel it working your core!

2. Forward and side lunges:  Standing near a pool wall for support, if necessary, take an oversized lunge step in a forward direction. Do not let the forward knee advance past the toes. Return to the starting position and repeat with the other leg. For a side lunge, face the pool wall and take an oversized step to the side. Keep toes facing forward. Repeat on the other side. Try 3 sets of 10 lunge steps. For variation, lunge walk in a forward or sideways direction instead of staying in place. I’m useless at lunges on land, so this is great, because it takes the pressure on the knees.

3. One leg balance: Stand on 1 leg while raising the other knee to hip level. Place a pool noodle under the raised leg, so the noodle forms a “U” with your foot in the center of the U. Hold as long as you can up to 30 seconds and switch legs. Try 1-2 sets of 5 on each leg.

4. Sidestepping Face the pool wall. Take sideways steps with your body and toes facing the wall. Take 10-20 steps in 1 direction and then return. Repeat twice in each direction.

5. Push ups: While standing in the pool by the pool side, place arms shoulder width apart on pool edge. Press weight through your hands and raise your body up and half way out of the water, keeping elbows slightly bent. Hold 3 seconds and slowly lower back into pool. (Easier variation: Wall push up on side of pool: place hands on edge of pool shoulder width apart, bend elbows, and lean chest toward the pool wall.)

6. Standing knee lift: Stand against the pool wall with both feet on the floor. Lift 1 knee up like you are marching in place. While the knee is lifted even with your hip, straighten your knee. Continue to bend and straighten your knee 10 times, and then repeat on the other leg. Complete 3 sets of 10 on each leg. For more of a challenge, try this exercise without standing against the pool wall.

7. Corner Pool Kick ups: Rest against the corner of the pool leaning back on your arms, which are resting on the edges of the corner. Kick your legs up one at a time, reaching as high as possible. I really feel this one working my my uppers legs!

I am fairly fit now, and swim regularly but I still start with these exercises. I feel the difference in my balance and strength from doing them, and they gave me the confidence to start swimming again and try the exercises out on land. It is also a lovely and relaxing way to wind down and clear your mind. I also find, if the water is warm, it can help with loosening muscles and easing aches.

If you are physically able to do some form of water exercise, it really is very beneficially. You can work the muscles, without putting the impact on the joint that you would in the gym.

It’s just a shame that for people with severe mobility issues, the specialist equipment and sessions are not readily available on the NHS. The sessions I attended for my level were £50 for 40 mins, which REALLY adds up. Hopefully as chronic conditions are better understood, alternative pain treatments such as hydrotherapy will be more available.

Synaesthesia and Me

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I’ve had synaethesia my whole life, but didn’t realise until I was about 15. I just thought everyone had the same kind of concepts in regards to senses as I did. I can’t imagine life without it, and I feel like I experience something really special. I don’t pick the colour or sensations I get, they just happen.

If you don’t know:

Synaesthesia is a condition where a sensation in one of the senses, such as hearing, triggers a sensation in another, such as taste. There are at least 80 different types of synaesthesia

For example, some people with synaesthesia can taste numbers or hear colours. Some people give personalities to days of the week or their emotions have colours. Read more about different types here.

A wide range of different synaesthetic experiences have been reported and recorded – a typical example is someone who described experiencing the colour red every time he heard the word “Monday”. You may have read about musicians who can hear colours. synesthetes are often very creative. Some artists to have reported having synaethesia are, David Hockney, Pharell Williams and Billy Joel.

What it’s like for me

I’ve read a lot about people hearing colours, which I do get but my strongest sense is smells triggering colours. I have always smelt colours and describe a smell to my friends as  specific colours. Generally, unpleasant smells evoke this horrible yellow colour which repulses me, whilst clean and pleasant smells evoke different blues (which is my favourite colour, because of this). I have an incredibly strong sense of smell and can often smells things most people can’t, so sometimes there can be a bit of a sensory overload for me.

Apparently, this form of synesthesia is very rare. I’d love to meet someone who also experiences this, because I find it fascinating and there isn’t a lot of literature on it.

Colours are also slightly tied up in emotions for me. When I first met my boyfriend I had a strong sense of blue towards him. Whereas people that I’m not so keen on are very orange. A loud annoying orange. This is also a rare one, typically of me. Some people’s personalities have colours, but not all.

When I look at letters, they have a sense of being ‘odd or even’. This also makes days of the week and months odd and even. I think this is related to the shape of the letters. The ones with more circular forms are even, whereas long thin letters are odd. I used to see colours for the different months, but I know longer has that sense. I also visualise time in a loop with dates going around it.

Different notes don’t have specific colours, but the sound an instrument produces does. For example the drums create a spectrum of greys. Not all instruments have colours though.

What’s the cause?

It’s likely that the brain of someone with synaesthesia is “wired” differently, or has extra connections.

brain imaging study has shown that when some people with synaesthesia hear spoken words, a part of their brain normally used to process colour from vision lights up.

Synaesthesia runs in families, although it may skip a generation and may not affect immediate relatives. It’s possible for only one twin to have the condition, or for family members to show different types of synaesthesia. In summary, there is a genetic contribution to synaesthesia, but the environment is also important.

I only know one other person with synaethesia and we aren’t related. No one, as far as I am aware has this in my family. Saying that, I’m the first known hypermobile and dyspraxic person and one of the only who is left handed….so I like to be special.

It’s possible for people to “grow out of” synaesthesia: there have been cases of people claiming that they used to experience synaesthesia, but no longer do. For a while I thought I had. It had dampened down a lot for me for a couple of years, but recently is has grown stronger again. Which I’m pleased about, because I would hate to lose it.

Is it common?

Synaesthesia has been estimated to affect at least 4% of the UK population.

Researchers at the University of Sussex have estimated that 1-2% of the UK population experience colour when they see, hear or think about letters and numbers, and that synaesthesia is just as common in women as in men (read the study).

Do you think you may have it? Let me know :)!

Rosacea Supplements

I’ve been trying different combinations of supplements to see the effects they have on my rosacea and general health and I think I’ve finally found my favourites. Do check with your doctor first if you are worried about the suitability of these supplements.

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Vitamin D

Since taking high dose vitamin D spray, I have REALLY noticed a difference. I used to get bugs and colds almost everything month. It has now been a year without having a cold. I am absolutely amazed, as I’ve never known life like this. I currently have my first cold in year, but it is nowhere near as bad as I used to get it. I would be in bed for a week in severe pain. Now I’ve just got a bit of a snuffle and headache. It’s crazy. I fully believe it is the DLux Spray I’ve been using. I go out for regular walks in the sun and take vitamins, but this spray absorbs faster into your bloodstream and gives you a higher dose.

Quercetin

For some people, the reason they flush is because of allergies and their Mast Cells reacting excessively to things. I have a lot of allergies and hypermobilty syndrome, so I think I may be experiencing this in a mild way. I have been prescribed strong antihistamines, but they make me drowsy, so I really wanted to find an alternative. There are many natural antihistamines and one which is very effective for rosacea sufferers is Quercetin. Quercetin is a naturally occurring bioflavonoid which can be found in apples and onions. I find taking a very small amount really helps stop flushing. I can’t tolerate a lot, as it brings on my vertigo.

Spirulina and Chlorella

Spirulina is good for a lot of reasons. It is a good source of iron, rich in protein, supports the immune system and is one of the best sources of iodine. It is also a natural antihistamine, so can be a good alternative to quercetin. Chlorella can boost the friendly bacteria in the gut which can be connected to rosacea.

 

These supplements definitely help me to feel and look good, but do check with your doctor of pharmacist before taking anything new.

Rosacea Toolkit

For as long as I can remember I’ve had trouble with my skin. It’s very inconsistent, so people never believe that I have problems with it. It’s either very good, or having an episode of flushing and breaking out.

I was diagnosed with mild rosacea last year and I like to think I do a pretty good job of managing it and stopping it for developing. I’m currently in ‘remission’ and I put it down to a few things, one of them being my beauty regime.

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Fans!

People often laugh at me and all my fans. I have hand fans for on the move and desk fans for when I’m at home or in an office. My rosacea is always sudden hot flushes, so if I can keep cool, I can hopefully stop the flushing.

Face Mists

I am a big fan of face mists, for their cooling and soothing effects. My favourites are Avène Thermal Water because it really cools my face down quickly and Trilogy Mist Toner, as it keeps my face moisturised. I also use the Clinque Moisture Surge Face Spray.

Moisturisers

In the daytime, I like a light moisturiser to wear under my make up. Clinque Moisture Surge is a firm favourite of mine. It has a light consistency and soaks in very fast, whilst being very moisturising.

In the evening I like to use a slightly richer moisturiser. I love Trilogy Vital Moisturising Cream. It’s not too rich but offers a deep moisturising quality. I always wake up with a lovely glow after using it.

Trilogy Rosehip Oil

This oil is a miracle oil. If I’ve had a really bad flair up and my skin has gone very dry, this sorts it out almost instantly. Combining nourishing essential fatty acids with super antioxidants, lycopene and phytosterol, it is deeply moisturising while helping to protect against environmental free radical damage. I also like to use it on an acne marks and other scars.

The first step to dealing with Rosacea is trying to work out your triggers. I find that spicy food, fermented foods, wine, dry heaters and stress are mine. Sometime though, you just have a random flush, so it’s great to get your toolkit ready!

I also find some supplements really helpful with preventing rosacea which are a key part of my toolkit. Have a look here.

Hotter Shoes

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I have had problems finding comfy shoes for as long as I can remember. Because I have Hypermobility Syndrome (and I broke my foot as a teenager and didn’t know!) it’s really important that I wear good supportive shoes.

My life has changed since discovering Hotter shoes. Particularly the designs using memorise insoles. I walk so much easier now and don’t feel frumpy!

My Hypermobility Toolkit

I’ve known I have Hypermobility Syndrome*(edit about reclassification below) since I was 16, so I’m fairly lucky. Many people suffering with this condition don’t get diagnosed until much later in life and damage (both physical and mental) is already done. It can cause chronic pain and fatigue, amongst a lot of other things.

For me, I’m on the milder end of the spectrum and so I have learnt how to manage my condition quite well. You have to be very disciplined with your exercise routine and pacing your day is key (I’m still trying to get the hang of this!)

I have a few go to tools which really help me with exercises and pain relief.

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Foam Roller

I don’t know what I did before I discovered foam rolling. I think everyone should be using a foam roller (*if it is physically possible for them to). A roller can be a valuable part of exercise warmup and cool down routines.

Rolling improves circulation, which gets the body ready for a workout and helps it recover afterward. Also, because rolling breaks down knots that limit range of motion, it preps muscles for stretching.

I find it an invaluable tool to get rid of tightness in the muscles in my legs especially.

Massage Balls

These are popular in yoga and I can see why. I find the spiky yoga balls really helpful to target niggling knots around my shoulder blades. If you don’t have one, tennis balls are also great. All you have to do is lean back on them against a wall and move around until you find the point which is bothering you. Since discovering self trigger point massage, I’ve suffered a lot less with back pain.

I recently bought the stick with the balls on it, which is amazing if you’ve got knots in both should blades! I bought the one above from Tiger.

Resistance Bands

I get pain around my shoulder blades because I’ve let myself become deconditioned recently. As my ligaments are lax in my shoulders and back, I have to make sure my muscles are as strong as the can be. To get my strength back I do a lot of exercise using resistance bands. The key to using these is to do lots of reps regularly, rather than doing something that uses a lot of heavy weight.

Light Hand Weights

As well as using the resistance bands, I also like to use light hand weights to tone my arms.  Using light weights and doing lots of reps can elongate the arm and get rid of bingo wings (I’m still waiting for mine to go!).

Kinesio Tape

If you suffer with any sort of instability or pain I highly recommend kinesio tape. Kinesio Tape alleviates discomfort and facilitates lymphatic drainage by microscopically lifting the skin. This lifting affect forms convolutions in the skin thus increasing interstitial space and allowing for a decrease in inflammation, reducing pressure while enabling a more effective flow of blood and lymphatic fluid in and out of the target area. It also adds a bit of stability to your joint, which is great if you subluxate them or just feel a bit wobbly!

Swiss Ball

One thing about hypermobility is that it can affect your proprioception. Proprioception is the concept of knowing where your body is in space (body awareness) and the ability to safely maneuver around your environment. It also includes the use of heavy work activities and the ability to stimulate the joint receptors. Therefore, practicing your balance can help with this. Just sitting on a swiss ball and lifting your legs one at a time can really help with this. I also like to do planks on the swiss ball and use it to aid squats against the wall. Doing this means you’re engaging your core, and you won’t be pushing the weight too far forward on your knees.

Heated Bean Bags

As much as you strengthen your muscles and massage out knots, sadly most people with hypermobility are chronic pain sufferers. I am very keen to not go down the medication route (although for some people, it is unavoidable). I find putting heat on my back helps ease it a bit.

Meditation

Meditation can help with distracting yourself from mild pain. I enjoy meditating to help with sleeping if I’m in pain at night and struggling to drift off or if I’m at the osteopath. One thing I would say is, I’ve heard from friends with chronic pain issues and their doctors have told them they’re ‘not trying hard enough to meditate’, if they are still feeling pain. This is nonsense. Realistically, sometimes pain is just too bad to meditate away.

These things really help me, but it must be noted that for some people with Hypermobility Syndrome or Ehlers Danlos Type 3* it is not possible for them to use some of these techniques, as they are in severe pain and suffer very frequent dislocations. I am extremely grateful that I am able to manage my condition as well as I do, and hope one day that there will be more therapies and medicines to help those who suffer so badly with this syndrome.

 

Edit*As of March 2017, Hypermobilty Syndrome has now been replaced by ‘Hypermobility Spectrum Disorders’. Ehlers Danlos Type 3 is a different condition separate from HSD and is know as hEDS. There are also now more types of Ehlers Danlos Syndrome. Read here for more information.

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